Posted by on October 26, 2019 11:36 am
Tags:
Categories: A-Featured A-Just In Congress, Senate, House Courts Dirty Tricks Impeachment Obstruction of justice Trump's White House Ukrainegate

A court’s finding that the impeachment investigation is the real deal was clearly spelled out in an order directing William Barr’s Justice Department to hand over confidential grand jury transcripts from the Mueller investigation to House committees. That’s gonna leave a mark:

A federal judge handed a victory to House Democrats on Friday when she ruled that they were legally engaged in an impeachment inquiry, a decision that undercut President Trump’s arguments that the investigation is a sham.

The declaration came in a 75-page opinion by Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell of the Federal District Court in Washington. She ruled that the House Judiciary Committee was entitled to view secret grand jury evidence gathered by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

Typically, Congress has no right to view such evidence. But in 1974, the courts permitted lawmakers to see such materials as they weighed whether to impeach President Richard M. Nixon. The House is now immersed in the same process focused on Mr. Trump, Judge Howell ruled, and that easily outweighs any need to keep the information secret from lawmakers.

And in a rebuke to the Trump administration, she wrote that the White House strategy to stonewall the House had actually strengthened lawmakers’ case.

That’s what happens when you hire the attorney equivalent of Wile E. Coyote.
And this is what happens when a corrupt dye-jobbed grifter occupying the Oval Office does everything he imagines he can to obstruct rightful investigations;

House Democrats had subpoenaed the witness, Charles M. Kupperman, who served as Mr. Trump’s deputy national security adviser, to testify on Monday. But in an effort to stop Mr. Kupperman from doing so, the White House said on Friday that the president had invoked “constitutional immunity,” leaving Mr. Kupperman uncertain about what to do.

“Plaintiff obviously cannot satisfy the competing demands of both the legislative and executive branches, and he is aware of no controlling judicial authority definitively establishing which branch’s command should prevail,” the suit said.

The implications of the suit, filed in federal court in Washington, extend beyond Mr. Kupperman. His lawyer, Charles J. Cooper, also represents Mr. Bolton and is likely to address congressional requests for his testimony in a similar fashion. House Democrats have had discussions with Mr. Cooper in recent days about Mr. Bolton testifying but have not subpoenaed him.

The general consensus is that Kupperman (and Bolton) will win, which may account not only for Donald Trump’s increasingly erratic freakouts but the intensifying smell of flop-sweat throughout the West Wing.

DEVELOPING…